Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance

Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance

In November 2012, Taos County Economic Development Corporation partnered with First Nations to develop the Alliance. The overall goal of NAFSA is to develop a movement that gives voice to issues of Native sovereignty, food-system control and policy development, and serves as a strong network for collaboration among various organizations engaged in Native food-system control. 

NAFSA’s Call to Action

Restoring Native food systems is an immediate and fundamental need for the continued survival, and physical and spiritual wellbeing of Native peoples and our Mother Earth – now and into the future. The costs of doing nothing – and the potential benefits of action – are massive.

We commit to take collective and individual action to address food sovereignty, and to build the necessary understanding and awareness among our Peoples, Nations, leaders and policymakers, as well as our youth and coming generations, to make it a continuing reality.

NAFSA is dedicated to restoring the Indigenous food systems that support Indigenous self-determination, wellness, cultures, values, communities, economies, languages, families, and rebuild relationships with the land, water, plants and animals that sustain us.

NAFSA brings people, communities (rural, remote and urban), organizations and Tribal governments together to share, promote and support best practices and policies that enhance dynamic Native food systems that promote holistic wellness, sustainable economic development, education, reestablished trade routes, stewardship of land and water resources, peer-to-peer mentoring, and multigenerational empowerment.

NAFSA works to put the farmers, wildcrafters, fishers, hunters, ranchers and eaters at the center of decision-making on policies, strategies and natural resource management.

We commit to take collective and individual action to address food sovereignty, and to build the necessary understanding and awareness among our Peoples, Nations, leaders and policymakers, as well as our youth and coming generations, to make it a continuing reality.

NAFSA’s Emerging Goals

  • Provide Networking Opportunities
  • Produce Educational Materials
  • Advocacy
  • Facilitate Change
  • Facilitate the Connection of Diabetes Education with Food Systems Analysis
  • Provide Support for Food System Assessment and Planning
  • Act as Funding Educator/Conduit/Re-granting/Fiscal Sponsorship
  • Provide Culinary History and Training/ Cooking/ Preserving

NAFSA Founding Council & Coordinators

The NAFSA Founding Council members are:

  • Clayton Brascoupe, Traditional Native American Farmers Association
  • Les Brown, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission
  • Josie Chase, Oglala Lakota College
  • Dan Cornelius, Intertribal Agriculture Council
  • Dana Eldridge, Diné Policy Institute, Diné College
  • Julie Garreau, Cheyenne River Youth Project
  • Terrol Dew Johnson, Tohono O'odham Community Action
  • Winona LaDuke, White Earth Land Recovery Project
  • Jon Matthews, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission
  • Jeff Metoxen, Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin
  • Dave Monture, Intertribal Agriculture Council
  • Loretta Barrett Oden, Native American celebrity chef
  • Tristan Reader, Tohono O'odham Community Action
  • A-dae Romero, Cochiti Youth Experience
  • Elvera Sargent, Akwesasne Freedom School
  • Rita Williams, Mvskoke Food Sovereignty Initiative

NAFSA Coordinators are:

  • Terrie Bad Hand, Taos County Economic Development Corporation
  • Pati Martinson, Taos County Economic Development Corporation

Become a NAFSA member or join our email list to get  updates concerning NAFSA.